jonEbird

December 23, 2011

Installing Pithos on Fedora within a Virtualenv

Filed under: adminstration,blogging,linux,python,usability — jonEbird @ 12:40 pm

I listen to a lot of music while at home. I am a Pandora user and have been very happy with my Pandora One subscription now for over two years. The machine used for playing my music is what I call my “media PC”. It is called that because this machine sits in my entertainment stand and is connected to my Sony receiver via HDMI making the multimedia experience as good as I can get. If you put those two facts together, you can see that I am staring at my desktop a lot and I thought it would be nice to integrate my TV into rest of the decor of the house. I primarily do that by being very selective in finding desktop pictures and generally clearing off the desktop of any clutter. Think of the large 47″ LCD television as one big painting for the living room.

Which leads me to my one, sole problem with Pandora: I like to look up and read the Artist and Title of the track being played but I don’t want the browser to also consume my visual space. (I also don’t want to mess around with Adobe Air for the desktop version of Pandora) Enter Pithos. By this point, I should point out that my media PC is running Fedora Core 15 and I’m a Gnome user (let’s not talk about Gnome3). That is important because Pithos was written for gnome users.

Pithos is great. It’s a simple UI design, still allows for normal Pandora song control, easy drop-down for my stations, can still star (thumb’s up) songs all the while being small and unobtrusive. And now we are to the subject of this blog post: Installing Pithos on a Fedora Core machine.

This installation guide will follow my other guides in the same “copy & paste” format. That is, below you should be able to simply open a shell, copy the block of shell code and paste it into your terminal and be ready to launch Pithos. The one configurable item I left in there is whether or not you’d like to install Pithos within a virtualenv or not. I won’t go into detail about what virtualenv is for this discussion, but suffice to say that you’d choose it if you want to install Pithos in a alternative path that you own instead of /usr/local/bin/. Below, when you copy & paste the instructions to install Pithos, you can simply leave out the variable "I_LOVE_VIRTUALENV" or change the value from anything but “yes” to install the “normal” way. I choose to install via virtualenv to 1. keep my system site-packages clean and 2. also keep /usr/local uncluttered. When I do this, I mostly only have to worry about backing up my home directory between rebuilds.

Again: If you’d like to use virtualenv, keep the "I_LOVE_VIRTUALENV" variable set to “yes”.
Furthermore, using virtualenv you can control the env path via setting the VIRTUALENV variable. Some people have a separate directory for their virtualenv’s. E.g. VIRTUALENV=virtualenvs/pithos
(Copy and paste away!)

# Keep this variable to install within a virtualenv.
#   otherwise, skip this line or change from "yes" to anything else.
I_LIKE_VIRTUALENV="yes"
VIRTUALENV="" # Set this to control where your virtualenv is created
# --- Rest is pure copy & paste gold ---
sudo yum -y install python pyxdg pygobject2 \
  gstreamer-python notify-python pygtk2 dbus-python \
  gstreamer-plugins-good gstreamer-plugins-bad \
  bzr python-virtualenv
# FYI, those last two are not direct requirements but tools to complete this
cd; bzr branch lp:pithos pithos
if [ "${I_LIKE_VIRTUALENV}" == "yes" ]; then
  virtualenv ${VIRTUALENV:-pithos_venv}
  source ${VIRTUALENV:-pithos_venv}/bin/activate
  # The money shot... finger's crossed
  cd pithos; python setup.py install
else
  cd pithos; sudo python setup.py install --prefix=/usr/local
fi

And there you have it. A clean, aesthetically pleasing music experience. Enjoy.
Desktop Shot with Pithos

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